Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Suddenly It's Summer

I blinked and the season changed from deep winter to 84F in the north side of the house.  Sweat was pouring into my eyes as I planted peas this morning--these are not optimal conditions for peas, who can deal with frost but hate the heat as much as I do. 

The garden is almost all in.  The southern transplants that I put in during the gale are looking great, thanks to the non-stop downpours.  The spinach I planted in two feet of snow last month is up, but if this weather keeps up it'll bolt before we can eat it.  Ditto for the lettuce.

In ornamental news, the plants that wintered indoors--zonal and scented geraniums, and a fairly sizable rosemary bush--are now outside.  I could practically hear the rosemary sigh as it fluffed itself out in the sun.  Some pulsatillas by the back door have put out their purple crocus-like flowers.  Other than that, nothing is blooming yet, unless you count the algae in the pond, which are putting on a magnificent show.

I guess what the old timers say about snow--that it's good for plants--is true.  Despite this long, cold winter, the third snowiest on record, I don't think I've lost a single plant.  The lilacs, including the one that was gnawed almost to death by our rabbit, are loaded with buds.  The lavender bushes, the climbing roses (also decimated by the rabbit), the giant hostas all prospered under that snowy duvet.

We're going shopping to the big city of Rutland (pop. 17,292) tomorrow, and I'm excited.  Here is my list:

16 broccoli transplants
8 big bags of mulch
dog food
laying pellets (for the hens)
a Havahart trap for the porcupine that's been eating our house (literally).  (Not sure what we'll do if we catch him.)
6--or maybe 8?--baby chicks!

9 comments :

  1. I am looking forward to a good porcupine story. Too bad it's eating your house. They are rather adorable creatures, especially when they climb trees.

    Why can't I find time to get to Rutland? My list, however, is boring in comparison. I need to get to Staples and another box store...

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  2. Are porcupines part of the beaver family?

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  3. A porcupine is eating your house??? Sounds like a subject for one of your drawings...

    I hope that porcupine doesn't attack one of your dogs. Yikes.

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  4. I found him/her in flagrante as I was coming back from dinner out last night. Adorable? Hmmm. This one seemed somewhat challenged in that department. I didn't know they climbed trees!

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  5. mrb, they might be, from their looks, and especially their passion for wood.

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  6. Elizabeth, the dog/porcupine interface does have me worried. Has Mika ever had an encounter? I hear the quills often have to be removed under anesthesia.

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  7. Thankfully, Mika has never encountered one, but I recently heard a hair-raising tale from the Lampshade Lady about dogs and porcupines. Her dog encountered one as a puppy and got a quill in the forearm. The spot where the quill lodged bothered the dog throughout life and she died at a relatively young age from a bone cancer that orginated in the same place. I don't know if the quill was removed. You might ask Lampshade Lady the story as I may have some details wrong but the bottom line is clear: porcupine quills are dangerous!

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  8. 34 degrees here this morning, leaden skies, howling wind. oh how i want to sweat in the sun.

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  9. Laurie, 34F and windy IS a bit much. But I'm glad spring has returned to VT--sunny and bright, no humidity, highs in the 60s...my definition of perfect weather, which happens, oh, ten days/year?

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